Friday, July 28, 2017

Poetry Friday -- Haiku



the caterpillars
unrecognizable
disguise mystery


©Mary Lee Hahn



I still haven't seen a single adult black swallowtail anywhere, all summer long. They have found my dill and parsley, however. Caterpillars have appeared and disappeared several times. A couple of weeks ago, they were all over the dill in various stages of growth. I brought in six, excited about watching the ten (TEN!!) I left outside grow up. When I went outside later that afternoon, all ten were gone from the dill, nowhere to be found. Food chain, I assume. I am glad I saved six.

Of the six, three have successfully chrysalized (is that a word?) and two are close -- still eating, but nearing the full-to-popping size they achieve before they reorganize all their body parts so they can fly. The mystery of the changes from caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly never gets old.


Caterpillar on dill, top right. Two chrysalises on bottom stick.



Two unrecognizable caterpillars -- top one is greenish, bottom one is brown.

Linda has this week's Poetry Friday roundup at A Word Edgewise.


15 comments:

  1. Hey friend,
    One of the first places I come on Friday morning is to YEAR OF READING. I know I will always find something NEW and DELIGHTFUL, or something that will make me see the world in a whole new way. True again today! I love the haiku, the story behind the haiku, and the photographs! Magical! CAW

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  2. Hooray for you & your rescued caterpillars! So true that they "disguise mystery." Good luck to your chrysalises!

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  3. Mary Lee, the magic of transformation is sight to see and you captured it beautifully here.

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  4. Have you asked the caterpillar, "Who are you?" a la Wonderland yet? 🐛

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  5. Glad you did keep the few. It is truly a mystery that never gets old, and I love to imagine that "inside" change. Thanks for the pics, too, Mary Lee.

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  6. We planted dill, hoping to make pickles, but something (rabbits?) chewed it down to the ground. No unfamiliar caterpillars here, but we have plenty of monarchs, unlike last year. Thanks for sharing the photos & the mystery!

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  7. I just wrote a picture book ms about the black swallowtail. How fun that you saved some. Something is eating my kale, but I haven't figured out what it is yet.

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  8. Wonderful haiku and so fun to see the pics. We're waiting to see the butterflies and another haiku!

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  9. I think chrysalized must be a word....and if not officially, it is on poetry friday! I love that this haiku comes from such rich experience. I can feel your soul sweetening with it from here.

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  10. I love that you saved these caterpillars and are watching their miraculous life cycle. I happened upon some swallowtail caterpillars one summer and remember marveling at and feeling a bit of ownership over their short lives.

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  11. How cool! I'm quite jealous that you are able to bring them in to watch the mysterious transformation up close. Well, as close as you can get. I planted a pollinator garden last year, but haven't found any caterpillars yet. I do enjoy watching the butterflies and bees flying about, though.

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  12. You're right - that never gets old! I'm so thankful for mysteries that are still around.

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  13. Next year I will plant dill and fennel and parsley and hope for caterpillars!

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  14. I am loving those who are nurturing caterpillars this summer. They are indeed mysterious.

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  15. Great pics of your caterpillar and habitat Mary Lee, can I use them in a drawing sometime? I love the last mysterious line of your haiku, thanks! I have seen a swallow tail in my backyard, and a monarch has been coming regularly and depositing eggs–I never tire of seeing any of this either.

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